The Village Green

Later also called the 12th Street Park, the 112th Street Park, the Village Park, and the Lansingburgh Park.


Detail of Village Green from “Birds-Eye-View of Lansingburgh, N.Y.” NYC: Galt & Hoy, 1879. [Curiously it shows the green bisected by Fourth Avenue.]

The Green was the center of the street plan for the village of Lansingburgh that was laid out in 1771 by Abraham Lansingh. The Green was deeded to the village by Lansingh’s heirs in 1793. Most of the early religious and civic buildings, such as the First Presbyterian Church, built in 1793-94, and the original Lansingburgh Academy, built in 1796, were located facing the Green. As the village expanded to the north and south, other areas of the community were developed as centers of commercial and community activity, and the role of the Green as the hub of Lansingburgh diminished in importance. The Village Green, however, has survived as an open space, now used in part as a recreation field. It is one of the few eighteenth century public spaces remaining in New York State.
Waite, John G. The Architecture of Lansingburgh, New York. Lansingburgh, NY: Lansingburgh Historical Society, 1976.


Chap. 224.

AN ACT to amend section two of chapter eight of the laws of eighteen hundred and sixteen, passed February fourteenth, entitled “An act to confirm the sale of certain common lands, made by the trustees of the village of Lansingburgh,” and to provide for the fund therein mentioned.
PASSED May 3, 1884; three-fifths being present.
The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:
SECTION 1. Section two of chapter eight of the laws of eighteen hundred and sixteen entitled “An act to confirm the sale of certain common lands, made by the trustees of the village of Lansingburgh,” is hereby amended so as to read as follows:
§ 2. The consideration money, that is commonly known as the commonable fund, which was received by the trustees of the village of Lansingburgh, under said act, and consisting of about five thousand dollars, may be expended by the board of trustees of Lansingburgh, or their successors in office, in whole or in part, as such board shall direct, for the purpose of improving, preserving and beautifying the grounds in said village, known as the public grounds, situated between Hoosick [113th] and Lansing [112th] streets, and which are owned by said village of Lansingburgh, and are now open to commons.
§ 3. This act shall take effect immediately.
Laws of the State of New York. Albany, NY: Banks & Brothers, 1884. 283.

Bicycle riding in the village park was forbidden.
“Village Trustees Meeting.” Lansingburgh Courier. May 11, 1893: 3 col 2.

A committee consisting of Village President Skillman and Trustees Bolton and Roemer, was appointed with power to obtain and place in position cannon in the village park.
Bids were received for the painting of the fence about Powers Park and the fountain in the village park, and Trustee Green was empowered to investigate the bids and report at the next meeting.
“Lansingburgh.” Troy Daily Times. June 30, 1900: 4 col 4.

—Charles Wood has been authorized by the Village Trustees to secure cannon for ornamental purposes to be used in the village parks. There not being enough money in the treasury to purchase the cannon and Mr. Wood having offered to purchase the cannon and hold the cost as claim against the village, he was authorized to do so by the Trustees.
“Lansingburgh.” Troy Daily Times. November 14, 1900: col 3.

Cannon For the Park.

President Skillman reported that the mortar to be placed in the village park had arrived, and another cannon, weighing 7,200 pounds, had been secured. A resolution was adopted on motion of Mr. Gray that the sum of $150, or as much therefore as is required, be expended by President Skillman and Mr. Bolton, as a committee, to pay for transportation of the guns to Lansingburgh and placing them in position on suitable foundations in the village park between Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets, and an audit was ordered drawn to them for the amount. On motion Clerk Miter was empowered to reindex the books and papers of the village at an expense not to exceed $100, the same to be done under the direction of the authorities of Troy.
“Upper Troy.” Troy Daily Times. January 2, 1901: col 3.

A Cannon For the Park.

The six-inch cannon secured from the United States government by the old Board of Village Trustees arrived in this city yesterday from Fort Wadsworth, New York harbor. It will be stored with the mortar, which arrived about three weeks ago, and both pieces will be mounted in what was formerly the village park in the spring at the direction of ex-Village President Skillman and ex-Trustee Bolton, the committee appointed to take charge of the matter. The sum of $100 is at the disposal of the committee for that purpose.
“Upper Troy.” Troy Daily Times. January 15, 1901: 4 col 2.

—A meeting of Post Bolton [Grand Army of the Republic] will be held next week, when arrangements will be made for exercises to be held in connection with placing cannon in the village park at Twelfth Street.
“Upper Troy.” Troy Daily Times. May 18, 1901: 4 col 3.

12th [112th] St. Park Lansingburgh N. Y.

12th [112th] St. Park Lansingburgh N. Y.

Photo of Village Green showing trees and dirt roads

Photo of Village Green showing trees and dirt roads

"MEET THE WINNERS—Doll show winners yesterday at the 112th Street Playground proudly display their prize-winning entries.  Left to right are Carolyn Dallas and her smallest doll, Carol O'Brien with the largest doll; Lorraine Mangione with the best stuffed animal and Gretchen Herd with the prettiest doll." Times Record. July 8, 1943: 18 cols 2-4.

“MEET THE WINNERS—Doll show winners yesterday at the 112th Street Playground proudly display their prize-winning entries. Left to right are Carolyn Dallas and her smallest doll, Carol O’Brien with the largest doll; Lorraine Mangione with the best stuffed animal and Gretchen Herd with the prettiest doll.” Times Record. July 8, 1943: 18 cols 2-4. (from scan by fultonhistory.com)

"PITCHING CARDS---TRADITIONAL PASTIME Caught right in the middle of this card pitching session at the 112th St. Park playground is Peter Malligan, nine years—who doesn't appear at all awed by the competition.  At left is Marlyn LaPlante, 14, and Louise Kruchesky, 14, is at the right." Albany Times-Union. September 2, 1956: T6 cols 5-7. (Times-Union Staff Photo) (from scan by fultonhistory.com)

“PITCHING CARDS—TRADITIONAL PASTIME Caught right in the middle of this card pitching session at the 112th St. Park playground is Peter Malligan, nine years—who doesn’t appear at all awed by the competition. At left is Marlyn LaPlante, 14, and Louise Kruchesky, 14, is at the right.” Albany Times-Union. September 2, 1956: T6 cols 5-7. (Times-Union Staff Photo) (from scan by fultonhistory.com)