The vast majority of the land for Oakwood Cemetery had been in the Town of Lansingburgh, with only a small southern portion in the City of Troy. That small area, within Batestown, had been part of the Town of Lansingburgh but had been annexed by the City of Troy prior to the creation of Oakwood Cemetery.

Some earlier features of the cemetery no longer exist: an observation tower called a “summer house,” a wood Superintendent’s cottage and stables a little east of the Troy & Boston rail line, a greenhouse, the covered bridge over the railroad, the metal bridge over the “Ullswater” in Section C and a smaller bridge in the area of sections Q and P, rustic shelters including one on the tiny island in the lake, a gatehouse at the Gurley Avenue entrance. There is still much of interest to see!


Sidney and Neff. “Elevation of Summer House.” Plan of Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N. Y. Philadelphia, PA: F. Kuhl, 1850.

Sidney and Neff. “Superintendent’s House.” Plan of Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N. Y. Philadelphia, PA: F. Kuhl, 1850.

Oakwood Cemetery, within Lansingburgh and Troy, cropped from Beers, Frederick W. ā€œPortion of Rensselaer County and Cities of Lansingburgh & Troy.ā€ Atlas of the Hudson River Valley from New York City to Troy. NY: Watson & Co., 1891.

Color depicting of night scene on Oakwood Cemetery's round lake or "Ullswater" crossed by metal bridge

“In Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N. Y.” postcard

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